Online Visitors

A few weeks ago I decided to expand the students perception of who can be a mathematician.  So, I organized video chats online with a few of my colleagues from around the country.  First and Second hour met with Ananth Hariharan from the University of Nebraska and Kristen Beck from the University of Arizona.  The students seemed to enjoy the conversation and asked some interesting questions as to what these people do as mathematicians.

The next block of classes met with Jack Jefferies and Morgan Cesa from the University of Utah. The students seemed to be interested in the espionage aspect of mathematics and whether or not a mathematician can be rich.  Jack and Morgan answered many questions and despite some technical difficulties, the students seemed very interested in hearing what other people are doing around the country.

The last block met with Courtney Gibbons from the University of Nebraska. Again the conversation was centered around how much money a mathematician makes.  Courtney did a wonderful job explaining to the students what is interesting as far as math is concerned and seemed to engage the students as well.

All in all, this activity was beneficial.  The students were able to ask interesting questions about the life of a mathematician and were able to see what other mathematicians physically look like.

Advertisements

About Branden

As a GK-12 Fellow, I meet with a group of middle school students at Rosedale Middle School in Kansas City, Kansas. There I talk to them about what a mathematician does and teach them ways of thinking about problems. I am a student of Craig Huneke at the University of Kansas. As a far as my research is concerned, I am currently studying the theory of maximal Cohen-Macaulay modules. In particular, I am interested in determining if countable Cohen-Macaulay type implies finite Cohen-Macaulay type over a complete local Cohen-Macaulay ring with an isolated singularity. I also enjoy working with Macaulay2 .
This entry was posted in 2011-2012 GK12, Mathematics. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s